January 2018
Dean’s Column

NSAGO Dean Andrea Handley

A very happy new year to you all!  If you’re a typical organist, you’re heaving a bit of a sigh of relief at this point, having a mountain of extra rehearsals and services for another Advent/Christmas season behind you. Welcome, “Ordinary Time”, in more ways than one!

Many of us had much fun this past Friday evening at the fourth annual Epiphany party (scroll down to see Sharon Peterson’s review of the event). Part of the evening was a trivia game, created by Bob Woodworth, with 40 questions about the history of our chapter – part of our commitment to have every program this season reflect some aspect of our history together. I’ve listed the questions below, and then the answers separately below the questions, so that you can take the quiz for yourselves. Although we didn’t keep score, I think we’d all agree that Morgan Simmons got the only A+ for the evening with his many correct responses!

NSAGO Dean Andrea Handley

Andrea Handley

Andrea Handley, Dean

 

 

 

 

North Shore AGO History Questions
Epiphany Party – January 5, 2018 

  1. The North Shore AGO Chapter organizational meeting was chaired by ________. 
  1. _________was elected Dean of the Chapter at the first meeting. 
  1. St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Evanston was served for a long time with a Hammond B-3, or a Hammond Grand 100 or an Austin Organ. 
  1. _________served St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Evanston for over 30 years. 
  1. _________served two non-consecutive terms as Dean of the Chapter. 
  1. What husband and wife both served terms as Dean of the Chapter? 
  1. _________played the dedication recital at the First United Methodist Church in Glenview on the ____________Organ. 
  1. What other husband/wife teams were also organists? 
  1. What four famous organists played recitals in the first year of the Chapter? 

    10._________was the Chapter’s first Regional Convention of the AGO. 

    11._________was the long-time Editor of The Diapason Magazine. 

    12._________initiates the Chapter newsletter Overtones. 

  1. In 1972 Han Wurman demonstrates the _________for the Chapter. 
  1. What four international organ artists played for the Chapter more than once? 
  1. Emmanuel Methodist Church in Evanston is home to the 1892 ___________. 
  1. _________was a long-time organ professor at Northwestern University and also Organist at Trinity Episcopal Church in Highland Park. 
  1. Speaking of Trinity Episcopal Church, the Aeolian-Skinner Organ installed there had a __________console. 
  1. What famous organist from St. Eustache in Paris played a recital for the Chapter in 1975?
  1. What newly appointed organist at Notre-Dame in Paris played a recital for the Chapter in 2016? 
  1. Who was organist at Fourth Presbyterian Church in Chicago, then at First Presbyterian Church in Evanston and finally at First Presbyterian Church in Lake Forest? 
  1. What English college choir performed for the Chapter? 
  1. the Chapter helped to sponsor the Romantic Organ Symposium in __________. 
  1. What Dean of the Chapter was the long-time musician at Northfield Community Church? 
  1. What concert organists from England presented recitals for the Chapter? 
  1. _________was long-time organist at First Baptist Church of Evanston – now the Lake Street Church – following William Barnes. 
  1. How many Deans of the Chapter are still alive? 
  1. Karel Paukert presented at least _________programs for the Chapter. 
  1. Many of the North Shore Chapter AGO programs were held at Alice Millar Chapel at Northwestern University. Who was Alice Millar? 
  1. Vail Chapel houses a Casavant Organ that was formerly at _________ that was formerly at _________. 
  1. Karel Paukert was originally from _________. 
  1. _________ and __________are the only Dutch organists to have presented programs for the Chapter. 
  1. _________is the only Belgian organist to have presented a recital for the Chapter. 
  1. _________is the only Italian organist to have presented a recital for the Chapter. 
  1. The 1938 _________Organ is located at the former First Church of Christ, Scientist in Winnetka – now called Grace Church. 
  1. Glenview Community Church installed a _________Organ in 1999. 
  1. The First Presbyterian Church of Evanston 1958 Aeolian-Skinner Organ contains pipes/ranks from previous organs _________ and _________. 
  1. The Winnetka Congregational Church is home to the 2008 __________Organ. 
  1. The Music Institute of Chicago (formerly the First Church of Christ, Scientist) in Evanston is home to the 1914 _________Organ. 
  1. The Chapter hosts its second AGO Regional Convention in __________. 
  1. ________, a member of the North Shore AGO Chapter was National President of the AGO in 1994. 

Epiphany Party – January 5, 2018 Answers 

  1. Margaret Budd
  2. Thomas Matthews
  3. Hammond Grand 100
  4. Porter Heaps
  5. Morgan Simmons
  6. Morgan Simmons and Mary Simmons
  7. Grigg Fountain – Holtkamp Organ
  8. Enright’s – Fountain’s
  9. Fred Swann – Virgil Fox – E. Power Biggs – Austin Lovelace
  10. 1961
  11. Frank Cunkle
  12. Leora DeFord
  13. Mood synthesizer
  14. Flor Peeters – Marie-Madeleine Durufle – Marie-Claire Alain – Gillian Weir
  15. Roosevelt Organ
  16. George McClay
  17. Schlicker
  18. Andre Marchal
  19. Vincent Dubois
  20. Richard Enright
  21. St. John’s College, Cambridge
  22. 1988
  23. George Williams
  24. Simon Preston, Gillian Weir, John Scott
  25. Jack Goode
  26. 22
  27. Three
  28. Mr. and Mrs. Foster G. McGaw gave money for the construction of Alice Millar Chapel in honor of his mother Alice S. Millar McGaw.
  29. Seabury-Western Seminary Chapel – Lutheran Church in Rockford
  30. Czechoslovakia
  31. Piet Kee and Gustave Leonhardt
  32. Flor Peeters
  33. Mario Duella
  34. W. W. Kimball
  35. Buzard
  36. Johnson & Son – Votteler-Holtkamp-Sparling
  37. Pasi
  38. E. M. Skinner
  39. 1973
  40. Margaret McElwain Kemper

January 2018
When You’re Good You’re so Good, and When You’re Bad You’re so Bad!”

Eileen Baumgarten

I got my start playing the organ when I was in 7th grade in Powhattan, Kansas, and was a member of Zion Lutheran Church.  The elders decided that they needed some new blood at the organ bench and asked my friend and me if we would take organ lessons and be willing to play for church for $1.00 a Sunday.  We accepted and took lessons that summer.  The church was unheated except for Sunday mornings so taking lessons in the summer and piano in the winter months was the way it all started.  (There were those times getting ready for Christmas Eve I practiced with a winter coat on until fingers were frozen.)  The biggest revelation sitting on the bench was seeing the minister go back into his study during the hymn right before the sermon when I assumed he was praying over his sermon and seeing from the organ bench that he was actually going out the side door and having a cigarette!  After high school I attended St. John’s Lutheran College in Winfield, Kansas, where I planned to study parish work with an emphasis in organ.  My organ teacher there persuaded me to audition at the University of Oklahoma with Mildred Andrews.  I was a very naive country girl had no idea what I was doing, but went with him for the audition and was accepted as a student.  I entered OU after finishing my second year at St. John’s in the fall of 1969.  It was an eye opener as well as awe inspiring when I walked into the music school’s opening program to hear Charles Benbow play Messiaen’s “Dieu parmi nous.”  I knew I was among some great talent and wondered what I was doing there.  Everyone loves to hear stories about Miss Andrew’s style of teaching.  All girls were required to wear skirts to all lessons.  Once I showed up in culottes which I considered a skirt, but Miss Andrews thought was too much like pants.  We went out into the hall to try to find another one “of her little chickens” to trade with so I could go home and change my clothes and come back with a skirt on so I could take my lesson.  We had two 30 minute lessons a week which she believed was more efficient than a once a week one hour lesson.  No time was ever wasted.  When your lesson was finishing, the next student would be at the edge of the stage, and she would wave you forward.  Then as one student was leaving the bench on the left, the other student was sliding on on the right, and the next lesson began no minute wasted. There was great respect, love and fear of our “Dear Teacher”.  I was never a prodigy or one of her outstanding students to go on and earn a Fulbright or major competition.  I was just glad to learn many good techniques and be able to complete my degree without being one of the students who would be asked to come in a room and told it was time to select a new major.  Lessons learned that I still use are practicing the alto line alone of a fugue, playing a difficult line backwards, if your feet make a mistake, it’s probably because your hands don’t know what they are doing, and one of the most valuable is the use of the Brahms Fifty-One Exercises For the Piano—specifically Nos. 24a, 24b, 27, 30, 33, 34, 39, 40a, 40b, 41a, 41b, 42a, and 42b.  The organ department at OU struggled some after her death, but is now flourishing with the American Organ Institute run by Dr. John Schwandt.

The title “When You’re Good You’re so Good, and When You’re Bad You’re so Bad” was taken from a quote Miss Andrews spoke to me at one of my lessons.  I just try to make “good moments” coming and keep the “bad moments” at bay.

Eileen Baumgarten

December 2017
I Never Dreamed….

Kay Sutton

My first experience hearing a pipe organ live happened when I attended the graduation of the Medical School at the University of Michigan as a child.  We were in Hill Auditorium when all the newly minted medical doctors, including a family friend,  stood up for the recessional.  At that moment, Marilyn Mason launched into the Toccata from Widor’s Fifth Symphony.  My sisters and I were totally overwhelmed.  Although my mother was a church organist, I never thought I would play a pipe organ or play that Toccata.  It seemed like a complete fantasy.

But then, much later in life I became an organist the way I believe many do.  The church I attended in Grayslake, IL decided to add a service and, since I was accompanying choirs and soloists regularly on the piano, I was asked to play the organ for this service.  After a few weeks of being clueless about pedaling and registration, I found a teacher.  Dr.  Marilyn Stulken, of Racine, WI and former Dean of the Kenosha-Racine Chapter of AGO, taught me all the basics and then decided I should work for my Service Playing Certificate. So the initial impetus for joining AGO was to achieve a higher and certifiable standard of playing, which I was able to achieve.  Then, she helped me find a job playing a pipe organ.   So now, many years later, I am still playing the 55 rank E.M. Skinner at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church that Ernest himself installed in Kenosha, WI during the 20’s, an organ that was completely refurbished by Marilyn’s husband, Tom Rench and Co. in 2003.  I also, on occasion, play that famous Toccata.

I have taken advantage of as many AGO activities as I can.  When Chicago hosted the National Convention, I helped at registration and monitored the ballroom.  Afterwards, the convention workers had a wonderful recital and party at the San Filippo Estate.  I also attended the Boston Convention where I attended a lecture on the history of the Skinner organ.  The week following the convention, the presenters of this lecture surprised me by coming to Wisconsin and visiting St. Matthew’s to see our Opus 505.  I also attended a Regional Convention in Kalamazoo that was very inspirational.  I plan to help Milwaukee with their regional convention in 2019.  A year or two ago I played on their Members Recital at St. Joseph’s Convent Church in Milwaukee.

On the local level, I have really enjoyed what the North Shore Chapter has to offer.  Last fall’s hymn workshop was just outstanding.  This year’s recital and masterclass by Janette Fishell was also wonderful.  And of course, I have loved the Epiphany parties!  My plan for the future is to have a POE event at St. Matthew’s church.  We have a number of people, including some from Carthage College who are interested in pursuing this.

As a resident of Illinois and an employee in Wisconsin, I have found it beneficial to belong to the North Shore, the Milwaukee, and often the Chicago chapters of AGO.  I have made great friends in all these organizations.  A few years ago we held a Halloween concert at St. Matthew’s and friends from the Milwaukee and North Shore chapters performed.  We packed the church and a good time was had by all.

Kay Sutton